Bread and Jam and Sparkling Wine? Can I be Person-Centred and Pluralistic?

Ani de la Prida, creative arts counsellor, psychotherapist, founder of the Association for Person Centred Creative Arts, and lecturer at the University of East London I have been a passionate person-centred therapist and trainer for many years. A couple of years ago I attended the pluralistic conference in London, and…

Arguing the Difference While Rome Burns: Perhaps Pluralism Can Help?

Andrew Reeves, Associate Professor in the Counselling Professions and Mental Health, University of Chester Like many others working in the psychological therapies I have, over my 30-plus years of being a practitioner, been immersed in the diversity of therapeutic approaches. Humanistic, psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioural – to name the loose umbrella headings…

Why We Should Acknowledge and Accommodate Clients’ Wants and Needs

Jonny Hutchinson, Trainee Counselling Psychologist, University of Roehampton This blog is a response to one of the points raised in Ong, Murphy, and Joseph’s (2020) critique of the pluralistic approach to counselling and psychotherapy. For reasons of space, I’ve chosen to address just one particular aspect of their argument, but…

Shaking the Pluralistic Kaleidoscope on a Central Asian Campus

Robin Higgins MA, University Counsellor and Well-Being Consultant, University of Central Asia, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Campus Well-Being blog: https://tenthstreetdinner.wordpress.com/ Pluralism is a process and not a product. It is a mentality, a way of looking at a diverse and changing world. A pluralistic environment is a kaleidoscope that history shakes…

Pluralism: Uniting the opposites

Richard Knight, School of Psychological and Social Sciences, York St John University, Lord Mayor’s Walk, York, YO31 7EX It’s always been an item on my bucket list to visit Gatecrasher (a club night that became popular in the 90s and early 2000s). Some of you will remember it as the…

Working together

By John McLeod I think it is important to be very careful around describing pluralistic therapy as ‘client-lead’. This is not wrong, but neither is it sufficient. It is correct in that pluralistic therapy is based on an assumption that to be human is to have sense of directionality (or…

Meta-theories

By John Mcleod If you look at the history of how therapy has developed, it is clear that it comprises a fairly continuous set of arguments around the relative importance of psychological constructs such as cognition, emotion, behaviour, relationships, and biology. These debates are fascinating but in the end have…