Bread and Jam and Sparkling Wine? Can I be Person-Centred and Pluralistic?

Ani de la Prida, creative arts counsellor, psychotherapist, founder of the Association for Person Centred Creative Arts, and lecturer at the University of East London I have been a passionate person-centred therapist and trainer for many years. A couple of years ago I attended the pluralistic conference in London, and…

Arguing the Difference While Rome Burns: Perhaps Pluralism Can Help?

Andrew Reeves, Associate Professor in the Counselling Professions and Mental Health, University of Chester Like many others working in the psychological therapies I have, over my 30-plus years of being a practitioner, been immersed in the diversity of therapeutic approaches. Humanistic, psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioural – to name the loose umbrella headings…

‘We’re making it up as we go along!’ Co-production in Pluralistic Person-Centred Therapy

Nicola Blunden; BACP Accredited Counsellor, Psychotherapist, Supervisor, and Trainer, Metanoia Institute, London; Co-Convenor Holi: Co-productive Research in Wales This blog is an overview of co-produced, pluralistic person-centred therapy, as I live it with my clients. I talk about co-production, and what it is generally in health care, where it has…

Working Online: A Practitioner Reflects

Allie Scott, BACP (Accred), PMCOSCA, ACTO Within the world of counselling and psychotherapy right now there is an awful lot of pressure on therapists to transition their work to the online environment – this is all very well and good but actually nowhere near as simple as might be hoped! Online counselling consists of a range of relatively…

Pluralistic therapy and William James’s A Pluralistic Universe

Jay Beichman, Counsellor/Therapist, Brighton. Pluralistic therapy seems—so far—to have had a tendency towards emphasising quantitative research and a desire to gain ‘scientific’ credibility. The 2nd International Conference of Pluralistic Psychotherapy and Counselling in 2019 matter-of-factly stated that they were ‘pleased to inform [me] that the scientific panel’ had accepted my…

Working Pluralistically with Religious Clients

John Wilson, Honorary Research Fellow and Director, Bereavement Service, York St John Counselling and Mental Health Clinic I recently delivered a public lecture on loss and grief at my university. After the event a member of the audience sought me out to say that she was experiencing anticipatory grief for…

On the Possibility of Hope Through Goals: A Reflection

Chris Lloyd, London Metropolitan University We’ve all had that feeling of stuckness with a client. Wondering whether we are competent or ‘skilled’ enough to support our clients towards change. I feel this is particularly so as we journey alongside clients who struggle with a sense of hopelessness in their lives.…

Client Preferences in counselling for alcohol problems

Jillian Walls, Abertay University Walls, J., McLeod, J., & McLeod, J. (2016). Client preferences in counselling for alcohol problems: A qualitative investigation. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 16(2), 109-118. doi: 10.1002/capr.12064 What to say about this research? I developed, like most counsellors, a keen interest in what clients wanted from counselling,…

Five tips for Positive Goals Work in Counselling and Psychotherapy

 Dr Gina Di Malta, CPsychol., Lecturer in Psychotherapy and Counselling, The Open University Setting goals in therapeutic work is used across a range of psychotherapies. It is especially commonplace in therapies such as cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), where clients may be encouraged to set SMART goals (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and…

Working together

By John McLeod I think it is important to be very careful around describing pluralistic therapy as ‘client-lead’. This is not wrong, but neither is it sufficient. It is correct in that pluralistic therapy is based on an assumption that to be human is to have sense of directionality (or…