Client Preferences in counselling for alcohol problems

Jillian Walls, Abertay University Walls, J., McLeod, J., & McLeod, J. (2016). Client preferences in counselling for alcohol problems: A qualitative investigation. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, 16(2), 109-118. doi: 10.1002/capr.12064 What to say about this research? I developed, like most counsellors, a keen interest in what clients wanted from counselling,…

Five tips for Positive Goals Work in Counselling and Psychotherapy

 Dr Gina Di Malta, CPsychol., Lecturer in Psychotherapy and Counselling, The Open University Setting goals in therapeutic work is used across a range of psychotherapies. It is especially commonplace in therapies such as cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), where clients may be encouraged to set SMART goals (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and…

Passionate about Pluralism

Mick Cooper, co-author of Pluralistic counselling and psychotherapy (Sage, 2011). Illustration by Agnieszka Zapart (www.obrazkoterapia.pl) Why am I passionate about pluralism? Why does it mean so much to me? If pluralism was a particular clinical technique, I’m sure I could really care about it; but I don’t think I’d ever…

Supervising from a Pluralistic Perspective

Mick Cooper, University of Roehampton What’s distinctive about supervision when it’s informed by a pluralistic approach? John McLeod and I talked about it in our original 2011 book and then Mary Creaner and Laco Timulak have written about it more extensively in the 2016 pluralistic handbook. Having practiced, pluralistically, as…

Training in the Pluralistic Approach

Mick Cooper, University of Roehampton One of the questions that I’m asked on a fairly regular basis is how you should go about training in a pluralistic approach, and whether it’s possible if you’ve already got a first training in another modality and don’t want to re-train. Julia McLeod and…

Using measures

By John Mcleod A theme that often comes up in conversations with pluralistic is the challenge of using feedback tools (CORE, ORS, etc) in therapy sessions. I would like to suggest three points here, for further consideration and possible discussion. First, it is helpful to look at what is happening…

Working together

By John McLeod I think it is important to be very careful around describing pluralistic therapy as ‘client-lead’. This is not wrong, but neither is it sufficient. It is correct in that pluralistic therapy is based on an assumption that to be human is to have sense of directionality (or…

Meta-theories

By John Mcleod If you look at the history of how therapy has developed, it is clear that it comprises a fairly continuous set of arguments around the relative importance of psychological constructs such as cognition, emotion, behaviour, relationships, and biology. These debates are fascinating but in the end have…

2019 Blog

We’re excited that John McLeod and other members of the network will be adding to this blog over 2019. Would you like to contribute to our blog? We would welcome your input. Please email us at pluralisticpractice@gmail.com